What is a Relaxed Performance?

Gondola 4

I recently performed the final show in the “Thread Bound” run as a relaxed performance and many people asked me what that means. Some thought it meant the audience needed to participate. Some thought it meant performers only perform at 2/3 their regular energy level. Some said they did know what it meant and it sounded a bit scary so they decided to avoid it. So today I am going to tell you what a relaxed performance is.

To clear up these misconceptions, I’d like to say that audience participation is NOT something that is added to a relaxed performance and the performers WILL still go all out and perform at their usual full intensity and artistry!

A relaxed performance is an inclusive performance practice in which the traditional theatre rules and expectations are relaxed and/or presentation is specifically designed to make theatre more welcoming to audience members who are neurologically different from the norm. Relaxed performances are sensitive and inviting to theatergoers who may benefit from a more relaxed environment, including, but not limited to those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), Tourette’s, concussion syndrome,  sensory and communication disorders, learning disabilities as well as other ways of being.

People who are neurologically different may have sensory-processing challenges that make light, sound and touch feel different: Sound might seem extra loud or a bright light cue might feel painful for them. Differences in processing speed might mean that it takes a while to understand what is being said on stage.  The emotional intensity of a play may seem unbearable without access to their regulatory stims such as rocking or making sounds. They may experience claustrophobia at the thought of having to sit still in a theatre seat for an hour. They may feel anxieties about audience etiquette as they strive to figure out what the social theatre rules are. All these different types of experiences may feel overwhelming and make theatre in a traditional setting not accessible to them.

Every production company will design their relaxed performances differently. Whatever the choices they make, it is important to remember that a relaxed show will never make a production 100% accessible. Nothing is every 100% due to competing access-needs. I will give an example from my personal life to help define competing access-needs. Both my son and I have high functioning Autism. Sometimes he needs to makes a clucking noise to feel right in his body and sometimes I need to repeat a specific sentence over and over to feel right in my body. The thing is that both our self-regulating stim methods drive the other person to distraction and irritability and thus represent completing access needs. What is helpful to one person might interfere with access for another.

A vital aspect of relaxed performance is that the artistic excellence of the production and director’s vision remain unchanged. Rather it is everything else that surrounds the production that may be adjusted to be more welcoming.

So what are the type of things might be involved in a relaxed performance?

  • House (audience) lights may be kept at a dim level rather than completely turned off
  • people may be invited to leave the theatre during the show and the re-enter of they want or need.
  • audience members may be asked to be aware of people’s needs to move or make noise.
  • sound and lighting cues may be adjusted to be less startling or intense
  •  “fidget” devices such as hand spinners may be welcome and yes this may even include the use of cell phones or other devices as long as they are kept in quiet mode.
  • self-regulation support items such as weighted blankets may be welcome or provided.
  • a copy of the script may be provided in advance so people can prepare or gain an understanding of the content on their own time.
  • description of possible triggers may be explained to the audience prior to the show.
  • earplugs or sunglasses may be provided.
  • people may be told its okay to plug their ears whenever they need to.
  • people may be given advanced entrance or a longer time than usual to leave the theatre to help them avoid crowded theatre aisle or lobby.

Since all relaxed performances differ in how they provide a more relaxed setting, it is vital that what is being provided is outlined at the time of ticket purchase. This enables theatergoers to get a sense of whether the production will be accessible for them. For instance, sometimes a director will decide that turning down the music or light level will not work for a particular scene because the performers need that level of intensity. So earplugs may be provided instead of lower music levels. If you cannot stand the feeling of earplugs you may decide to bring your own noise-canceling headphones or decide not to go.

Production companies should not shorten their program by cutting out scenes as part of a relaxed performance. By doing this, they are making choices based on what they think is best for a disabled theatergoer. I offer that production companies put the choice in the hands of the theatre-goer. Present your full production and let the theatergoer make their own choice to self-edit by leaving the theatre for moments if they need or to want to.

Recently, my dance company REAson d’etre productions did a relaxed performance of “Thread Bound”.

This is how we designed the show to be more welcoming to those with neurological-difference: 

  • Music was played slightly lower than usual.
  • “Stim” gadgets were welcome, including cell phones or devices as long as they are in quiet-mode.
  • audience were asked to be aware of people’s needs to move or make noise
  • people could leave and come back in as needed.
  • script was sent to attendees ahead of time so they could process the meaning of the text and work-through/prepare for possible triggers on their own time.
  • ear-plugs and sunglass were provided at the box-office to be worn in sections in which blinking-lights and sound levels might be painful for some.
  • description of possible triggers was given prior to the performance.

After the performance, the box office manager said, “providing earplugs was a waste of money as hardly anyone used them.”  He guessed that people who needed earplugs had brought their own and suggested that for the next relaxed performance we forgo supply them.  I explained that even if no one had used our earplugs that they were still an important relationship-building tool. As a person with Autism if I arrive at a show and saw that earplugs were provided I get a sense that who I am is visible and my needs are being considered. This is a wonderful moment of being seen that builds a positive relationship between me and the producing company even if I had brought my own earplugs.

Photo credit: Suzanne Liska and Kathleen Rea in Thread Bound

 

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